How Much Porn Can You Buy For Your Kindle?


Erotic E-books Dreamstime


Quite a lot, apparently. But do you really want to look at nudie pics on a 6-inch, electrophoretic, black-and-white screen?

The porn industry has always been on the forefront of technological progress, pushing us into the world of video chat, streaming media, broadband access and online payment systems. It appears they're also getting into the e-book business.


Both Amazon and Barnes & Noble have clear content policies against porn in self-published titles, and Amazon employs both automated and human filters to keep sexxy content out of their marketplace. Yet porn is flourishing on both sites.


A quick search for "erotica" in the Kindle Store brings up 400 pages worth of titles, despite the fact that Amazon refuses to oblige me by autofilling the search bar. Those books range from poorly-written short erotica to pages of low-resolution still images, both often snagged from easily available sources around the internet. It gets us wondering--it might be tricky to navigate the porn world on an E-Ink Kindle, but it's very easy to do on a smartphone or a tablet. So who's actually buying six pages of misspelled erotica for the train ride to work? Especially when they're often as algorithmically-composed as a @Horse_ebooks tweet?


CNET has the down-low on Amazon's dirty self-published secret:





A disruptor of the traditional publishing platform, Amazon makes it easy for authors, illustrators, and photographers to sell their content without the discouragement, or the discerning eye, of an editor or publisher. The company has propelled the rise of e-books, a medium that's growing as interest in paper books decline.


This has created an opportunity for peddlers of e-book smut. These self-publishers aren't established pornographers, for sure; they can't be found via online searches or in business directories. And it's hard to imagine their titles -- like the 99-cent "Wife Pictures: XXX So Hot And Sweet To Turn You On," which an Amazon reviewer described as a "scrapbook of random Internet women" -- ever reaching anything near Jenna Jameson scale.








Sounds like the perfect content to download over something called the "Whispernet."


[CNET]